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JOEL Joel's Blog

A Visit to the New MakerSpace NYC at the Brooklyn Army Terminal

09/04/2019

The courtyard of building 'B' is colossal. MakerSpace NYC is off to the right.
The courtyard of building 'B' is colossal. MakerSpace NYC is off to the right.

Last week I visited my friend Annie Raso at the new MakerSpace NYC at the Brooklyn Army Terminal. Annie, who used to work for TFWW and has taught classes here, is now their new shop director.

The Brooklyn Army Terminal is a huge, multi-building complex built by the US Army after World War I as a warehouse depot. After a brief heyday in WWII, it was largely abandoned for years, until the City of New York bought it and rehabilitated the buildings for modern light manufacture.

About two years ago the City decided to use some of the space for a maker space to educate a new generation of makers; train craftspeople; and provide a venue for budding makers. The first public/private partnership that operated the space fell over two weeks after it opened, and the maker space was closed as the City looked for management. Recently MakerSpace NYC, which runs a large maker space in Staten Island, was given the nod and the keys to make the Army Terminal a success.

The space is very large (20,000 sq feet), and probably the best equipped makerspace of any kind on the East Coast. The equipment is new, organized, and spread out over a comfortable amount of room.

Currently MakerSpace NYC is busy getting all the equipment sorted and starting classes up. A lot of their classes so far have been apprentice training, mostly metalwork, for entry level craftspeople. As you can see from the photos below, their equipment covers a wide range of crafts and materials. Probably their best coverage is in the metal shop -- with two welding setups, two CNC milling machines, multiple traditional lathes and mills, and a waterjet machine. To use these machines you need to become a member or get a day pass and pass qualifying tests on the machines.

The woodshop is very well set up for modern work, with two CNC routers along with the traditional machines. Although bench space is limited, there is plenty of room to work in the main space right outside the wood shop.

On the modern side, they have multiple laser cutters (not metal cutting) and both resin and filamant 3D printers. This is a real area of strength for them.

They have an area for fabric arts, which has a bunch of high-end sewing machines and a CNC 10 color embroidery machine.

The address is 58th and 1st Avenue in Brooklyn. There is a fair amount of parking around. The R and N trains are about 3 blocks away. And there is a ferry that stops their too.

Click here for details on MakerSpace NYC‘s classes, how to join, and how to schedule a tour.

We wish MakerSpace NYC great success in this venture. Having the right tools and space in which to make things is a major challenge - especially for apartment dwellers in our space-challenged city. It's also nice to have a community to share ideas and company. Maker Spaces offer real opportunities to creative people who want to create.

Welding
Welding


Just a few of the traditional manual metalworking machines.
Just a few of the traditional manual metalworking machines.


Metal lathes and one of their two CNC mills
Metal lathes and one of their two CNC mills



The back of the woodshop
The back of the woodshop


A better view of the woodshop
A better view of the woodshop


More woodshop
More woodshop


Even more woodshop
Even more woodshop


About half of the 3D printer setup
About half of the 3D printer setup


Lasers - lots of them
Lasers - lots of them


The CNC embroidery machine
The CNC embroidery machine


A view of Building 'A'
A view of Building 'A'

Join the conversation
09/04/2019 Tony Sade
That does it! I'm moving to Brooklyn, or anywhere in the vicinity. Thanks for the write up, Joel.

Tony Sade
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