Tools for Working Wood
 

 The Work Magazine Reprint Project

WORK No. 161 - Published April 16, 1892   

04/16/2015




Work Magazine asking the tough questions of the time. If a man only works 8 hours a day, then what could he possibly be doing with all that "play" time. Learn how to build a philomela perhaps?




And what of the modern man? When you are done with your 8 hours, or, if so inclined during your 8 hours, may we suggest brushing up on another newsworthy topic of the time? Tesla v. Edison


-Marisa

Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.4 - No. 161 •





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WORK No. 160 - Published April 9, 1892   

04/09/2015




This week, there's a great article on "The Art of Staircasing," a promising first installment on the specula of the Newtonian Telescope, and more than a few remarks on the construction of an indexing plate for elliptical turning. But I know what you really want; what all Work readers secretly crave.



That's right. It's time to get your overmantel on. Again. In Work, no single idea has been proposed more strenuously to the readers than the notion that the wall above your mantle should be covered with something. Anything.



Lots of loyal readers know this to be true, but if you're new here are a few links to previous issues laden with overmantel. Click on them all for a trip down memory lane. I dare you.





No doubt more mentions could be found by anyone willing to comb through the "SHOP" section found among the back pages of each release. It's hardly the point though. I want to know why. Please submit your theories in the comments section.


I'm willing to concede that the fixation is merely a fad of fashion, but part of me wants to psychoanalyze the Victorians a little more savagely. For instance, If you've ever heard the (confoundingly hard to attribute) yarn that Victorians would often drape and cover the shapely legs of furniture in the name of modesty, you could formulate the hypothesis that the chimney stack and hearth masonry might be in some similar need of being dressed and concealed.





Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.4 - No. 160 •





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WORK No. 159 - Published April 2, 1892   

04/02/2015




Vital instruments for those who would make and reshape the world around us. Compare and contrast as you will. I place the panel gauge and the spectroscope largely on equal footing, with the notable exception being you can have a pocket version of the spectroscope.




How do I justify this equation? Not formally, that's for certain. Still, woe unto thee that can handle a spectroscope but not a panel gauge, and woe unto thee who hath got the same trouble the other way around. -T








Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.4 - No. 159 •





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WORK No. 158 - Published March 26, 1892   

03/26/2015




"One thing is certain- the temporary scare will give the metal button workers another chance."





Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.4 - No. 158 •





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WORK No. 157 - Published March 19, 1892   

03/19/2015




Happy Work Day! Volume IV begins today. It should be said that the Work Magazine Reprint Project owes a debt of thanks to Marisa and Naomi, two behind-the-scenes workateers who are responsible in no small part for getting us this far.

Here's to another bewildering year in the 1890s. We wanted to get you flowers and corn, but it's apparent that they had only the loosest idea of what corn was back in 1892. Simple times.


Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.4 - No. 157 •





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WORK No. 156 - Published March 12, 1892   

03/12/2015



Greetings all. Another year has come and gone. This is the last issue of Volume 3. How can you tell? Apart from the majestic cover art, there's a whopping fifteen articles this week! Sure, at least one of them is about a novel method of cooling butter, but the rest are pretty outstanding. Some of them are downright mysterious.

How mysterious? Well it's difficult to show in an engraving but Fig. 1 below shows two clock hands on a clear, glass disk, apparently moving without the aid of any perceptible gears or mechanism. I won't give away the secret here. You'll have to read the PDF yourself. That's how I feel about secrecy. -T



Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 156 •





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The opinions expressed in this blog are those of the blog's author and guests and in no way reflect the views of Tools for Working Wood.
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Recent Blogs:
WORK No. 161 - Published April 16, 1892 -04/16/2015
WORK No. 160 - Published April 9, 1892 -04/09/2015
WORK No. 159 - Published April 2, 1892 -04/02/2015
WORK No. 158 - Published March 26, 1892 -03/26/2015
WORK No. 157 - Published March 19, 1892 -03/19/2015
WORK No. 156 - Published March 12, 1892 -03/12/2015
WORK No. 155 - Published March 6, 1892 -03/05/2015
WORK No. 154 - Published February 27, 1892 -02/27/2015
WORK No. 152 - Published February 13, 1892 -02/20/2015
WORK No. 153 - Published February 20, 1892 -02/20/2015
WORK No. 152 - Published February 13, 1892 -02/13/2015
WORK No. 151 - Published February 6, 1892 -02/06/2015
WORK No. 150 - Published January 30, 1892-01/30/2015
WORK No. 149 - Published January 23, 1892-01/23/2015
WORK No. 148 - Published January 16, 1892-01/16/2015
WORK No. 147 - Published January 9, 1892-01/09/2015
WORK No. 146 - Published January 2, 1892-01/02/2015
WORK No. 145 - Published December 26, 1891-12/26/2014
WORK No. 144 - Published December 19, 1891-12/19/2014
WORK No. 143 - Published December 12, 1891-12/12/2014
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